Friday, 2 December 2022

Inspired by La Haie Sainte

 Inspired by the famous farmhouse in the Battle of Waterloo, and with a brick imprinting roller purchased by happenstance from the local hobby store, I set about to create my version of a Belgian farmhouse from pieces of foamcore, card, and sheets cut from those styrofoam meat trays from the supermarket - served both in black and white.  These give you a cheap means of thin walls of brick to work with although the 'gate tower' used a one thick piece insolation pink foam which makes a better/deeper impressed pattern (softer material undoubtedly).

For good or bad I tend not to use precise measurements and simply suggest "it's close enough"  (my wife states it is "The Tao of Doug"). Well, what's 1 or 2mm off, going to make a difference.... Obviously no real planning and certainly missteps in the design and execution.   I probably should fill in some of the corners and such but I tend to get too excited or impatient or dis-inspired to bother.  When the rest comes together I regret the negligence. The tao-ism it must be said.   However, it is the old-timey way and inexpensive, and it may be said in a sadistic way, fun part of the hobby. 

                                                                Early construction views:


  


Initial painting:



 
                                                                 Final result:                                                   





French dismounted dragoons (Perry plastics) advancing upon the farm defended by Brunswicker lights in the courtyard (converted Perry British Napoleonics) and Brunswicker Jagers in light grey (converted from Perry early ACW plastics). The farm will undoubtedly form the centerpiece for many of my Waterloo campaign games.

 


4 comments:

  1. The Tao of Doug seems to work just fine and I follow a similar path myself! The buildings look great and should get a lot of use, I imagine. Hougemont next??!

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    1. "The Tao" is a direct result of using scrap pieces of material and, well, the continued inability to cut a strait and even line..
      Not the size of Hougomont, but 'inspired by' ? perhaps.
      Thanks for the kind comments

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  2. Replies
    1. Nothing close to your quality, but I will take the compliment. Thanks.

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