Wednesday, 3 February 2016

Uvanov's Cavalry "Corps"

Painting for a good time, not a long time.
With this in mind, the large ratio for our Napoleonic games has one to paint a mere three horsemen to represent a whole brigade of cavalry.  Surprisingly it looks good on the tabletop and allows us to play most of the larger of the Napoleonic battles in 28mm on the usual convention sized table (usually 9' by 6'or less) .

Many of the guys who have played these games in the past are excited enough to now collect a "corps" or two for the cause, as we are preparing to do the large Battle of Borodino in May.  One of the Russian formations which I volunteered to complete is Uvanov's Cavalry Corps, positioned on the right flank of the Russian army and were sent along with Platov's Cossacks to rampage against the French left.  I represent this formation with two elements of hussars: the Russian LifeGuard Hussars and the Elizabetgrad Hussar Regiment picked among the several regiments within.

The figures use plastic Fireforge medieval horses with added saddle rolls to give the troopers the campaign look and, frankly, to coverup the slight gap between the horse and the plastic Perry riders who themselves are a conglomerate of miscellaneous bits and pieces of French and British hussars with Russian heads. Some of the Russian hussars historically may have carried lances for which I used French standards with the eagle cut off and pennons added. I used these as I ran out of sword arms!




6 comments:

  1. Zounds! Red jackets? Who knew?
    Looking great as always Doug. I like the socks and head markings on the horsies.

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    1. Yeah, Reds before their time I guess, but the Guard Hussars and Guard Cossacks wore the distinctive colour. I don't really like horses nor painting them but the white bits do make them more realistic in look.
      Thanks for the kind comment.
      cheers.

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  2. Really good looking Cav you got there.

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    1. Thankfully we need few of each as completing horses is not one of my joys of painting but one which is unavoidable when most of my armies are within the 'horse and musket' era!
      thanks for the compliment.

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  3. These look really nice, Doug. Beautiful work on the horses!

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    1. While I am still of the mind of "if it is brown, it is a horse" but the white markings (often used to cover up missed highlighting!) offers a bit more true horsey look.
      Thanks for the kind comment.

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